#MyWordsMatter at WIU… Nationally syndicated columnist agrees

#MyWordsMatter at Western Illinois University

To raise awareness of the impact of the words we use, a group of WIU graduate students, who were charged with a mission to create a project that would make the world a better place, have created the #MyWordsMatter campaign at WIU.

“To raise awareness of the impact of the words we use, a group of WIU graduate students, who were charged with a mission to create a project that would make the world a better place, have created the #MyWordsMatter campaign at WIU. The campaign, which began last semester, is picking up momentum across campus.” — Western Illinois University

For a Western Illinois University press release in early March, University Relations Director Darcie Shinberger interviewed AJ Lutz, the assistant director of communication and marketing for Western Illinois University Housing and Dining Services, who provided the background of the grassroots campaign #MyWordsMatter at Western.

Last week, the release caught the attention of Suzette Martinez Standring, a nationally syndicated columnist with GateHouse News Service.

In her piece, “Word choice matters,” Standring reflected on her own experience when she didn’t think about the implications of a word she used:

Years ago while at a cafe, I complained about buying a jacket at full price, only to find it elsewhere at 75 percent off. “I got gypped on that deal,” I told my friend. Nearby, a stranger cut in on us, “You shouldn’t use ‘gypped,’ because it’s a racial slur. It suggests that all Gypsies cheat and steal. The term is offensive.”

I retorted, “You know what’s offensive? Eavesdropping on other people’s conversations.” I left, annoyed at political correctness run amok. Yet once I realized the word had a racial element, I never used it again.

Suzette Martinez Standring

Suzette Martinez Standring is a nationally syndicated columnist with GateHouse News Service. Read more about her work at www.readsuzette.com.

In her column, Standring also noted the #MyWordsMatter buzz.

“Unknowingly, eight classmates created a campus-wide movement among 12,000 students who now promote taking responsibility for one’s words,” she wrote.

Standring also interviewed Lutz and noted that he suggested ways to speak up in a respectful way that doesn’t create shame or anger in others.

Use reflective questions. For example, ask, “Do you know what you’re saying when you say ‘that’s so gay?'” Often people will admit it’s something they’ve heard, or common slang, but it gets them thinking. Use a kind tone, and a meaningful conversation may emerge.

Read Standring’s column at www.norwichbulletin.com/columnist/x168224319/Suzette-Martinez-Standring-Word-choice-matters and follow the #MyWordsMatter campaign on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MyWordsMatter.

Make it a win for wine! Alumna’s small retail biz gets some big-time attention

Susan Kaufman, WIU Alumna and Proprietor of Market Alley Wines in Monmouth, IL

Kaufman’s small Monmouth-IL based business has recently gotten some big-time attention. She entered a video about Market Alley Wines in the National Retail Federation’s “This Is Retail” nationwide video contest. Vote for Market Alley Wines at www.retailmeansjobs.com/ThisIsRetail/SusanKaufman_profile.

At age 45, Susan Kaufman found herself at a crossroads in her life. According to the Western alumna (Kaufman graduated from WIU in 1988 with her bachelor’s degree in mass communications and a minor in professional writing), she worked for many years as a journalist, left that career for a job in marketing, and realized that she “worked very hard selling a product that I wasn’t that enthusiastic about.” She decided she would be much happier working for herself.

And so Market Alley Wines was established.

Kaufman’s small wine retail business, based in Monmouth, IL, has recently received some big-time attention. She entered a video about Market Alley Wines in the National Retail Federation’s “This Is Retail” nationwide video contest, and, as of this week, her video is a top ten finalist. The winning video will garner the retailer a $25,000 prize. You can vote for Market Alley Wines, through Sunday, April 15, at www.retailmeansjobs.com/ThisIsRetail/Matchup/14.

During all the excitement and, of course, running her busy small retail business, she was kind enough to take time of out her schedule and answer some questions about her retail venture and the video contest.

Q). When and why did you open Market Alley Wines?

I have always been a wine enthusiast, love working with people, and had retail experience, so it seemed like the right choice. I made the decision in February of last year to move forward with Market Alley Wines and opened June 7, 2011.

Q). Were you at all daunted by the fact you were opening a small business in a difficult economy and in, what some would call, an even more difficult market in west central Illinois?

A small business in a small town in a bad economy. What could go wrong? Actually, not much has. I did a considerable amount of research in both the wine industry and the local economy, and both showed signs of potential. Monmouth was lacking a “destination” spot… a place where people gather, visit, and relax. I certainly did not enter into this business lightly. But Monmouth is like so many other small communities. We once had many thriving businesses downtown, and now there are very few businesses. I think people now get the reality that, to keep businesses in their communities, they have to support them. It doesn’t hurt that my wine shop is beautiful and comfortable.

Q). What do you consider the most challenging aspects of operating a small business like yours in a rural region?

There is often a perception that a small-town business will be “hill-billy” or crappy, but that isn’t always the case. So many times when people walk through the door for the first time, I hear them say they can’t believe the store is in Monmouth. It is an environment that beckons a big city, but with the charm of a rural downtown. Just because we are small town doesn’t mean we have to sacrifice quality.

Q). What did you do before opening your business in Monmouth?

I counted about 30 jobs from my first at age 13 as a corn detasseler to the present. It isn’t like I can’t keep a job, rather I kept struggling to find one that could hold all my interests. I love a job where every day is different and you never know what the day will bring. I love being creative. I love learning something new every day and sharing that knowledge. I love people and enjoy it so much when people leave my store happy. This job has all of those qualities, plus I am my own boss so my success depends on me. And I don’t have a dress code.

Susan Kaufman, WIU Alumna and Proprietor of Market Alley Wines in Monmouth, IL

Visit Market Alley Wines online at marketalleywines.com.

Q). Why did you decide to enter your business into the “This Is Retail” video contest?

My entire life philosophy the past few years has been “What do I have to lose?” And after I heard about the contest, I thought my story had some legs.

Q). If you win the contest, what will you do with the money you win?

I would love to start a yearly wine and music festival in downtown Monmouth. Something that could give back to this awesome community but also bring new people into our town that could help other businesses.

Q). Anything else you think is important to highlight?

I tried to model my business on those places that I love frequenting. The kind of place where every time you go in, there is something new. A place where the owner or workers know me and know what I like. A place that is inviting, clean, smells nice and plays great music.

I think I’ve done so well in this contest because we are in a small community in the Midwest. We stick together and support our own. I’ve really been so touched by all the support I’ve received.

WIU Professor in the Middle of Nine-Month Washington, D.C. Fellowship

A Western Illinois University associate professor has spent the last nine months studying the U.S. political process in Washington, D.C.

Janna Deitz, associate professor at Western Illinois University, was the recipient of the American Political Science Association's Congressional Fellowship to spend nine months studying politics in the nation's capitol.

Janna Deitz was the recipient of the American Political Science Association's Congressional Fellowship to spend nine months studying politics in the nation's capitol.

Janna Deitz was awarded an American Political Science Association’s Congressional Fellowship to study politics in the nation’s capitol. Deitz then moved on to interview with congressional offices for work placement for the balance of the fellowship. She eventually secured a job with U.S. Senator Dick Durbin.

While in Washington, D.C. Deitz has also bumped into numerous WIU graduates. For more on this story, visit wiu.edu/news/newsrelease.php?release_id=9739.

Alum’s life’s work is up in the air

Mike Vondruska is the founder of the Illinois Juggling Institute in Bolingbrook.

Mike Vondruska is the founder of the Illinois Juggling Institute in Bolingbrook.

Mike Vondruska, who earned his bachelor’s degree from Western in 1978, is the founder of the Illinois Juggling Institute in Bolingbrook, according to an article in “The Joliet Herald-News” by Denise Baran-Unland.

Baran-Unland’s piece notes: “[The] llinois Juggling Institute offers motivational assembly programs, student participation workshops, entertaining performances and juggling supplies for beginners.”

Baran-Unland writes: “The [juggling] skill amused Vondruska for awhile, then he forgot about it until he was a sophomore college student at Western Illinois University in Macomb. Another student was teaching a community course at the school on juggling. Vondruska, intrigued, took the class, befriended the teacher, and later became the class’s teacher.”

Read more about Vondruska, and his scheduled performance for the Saturday (April 7, 2012) Timbers of Shorewood annual 10,000-egg Easter Egg Hunt, in “Man’s life is a juggling act” at http://heraldnews.suntimes.com/lifestyles/11616564-423/mans-life-is-a-juggling-act.html.