October COAP Employee Spotlight: Joe Roselieb

Joe Roselieb and Col. Rock III

Joe Roselieb and Col. Rock III

The Western Illinois University Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) employee featured in this month’s COAP Spotlight is usually the individual at the other end of Col. Rock III “Rocky‘s” leash…

In his day job, Joe Roselieb serves as the director of residential facilities for University Housing and Dining Services (UHDS). But at night–and at Western Illinois Athletics‘ games, and in parades, and at WIU AdmissionsDiscover Western open house events, and at many, many student activities, and at alumni events–his main job is to serve as Rocky’s person.

Rocky joined the WIU family in May 2010 as a 10-week-old pup. Since then, Joe has been providing him with a loving home, teaching him tricks, making sure he’s healthy and chauffeuring him to numerous WIU and community events each year.

“It’s been a terrific experience taking care of WIU’s mascot,” Joe noted. “My day-to-day job isn’t always that glamorous, so it’s a real treat to get to be able to take Rocky around and see the positive impact around both the campus and community.”

Joe took time out his (and Rocky’s) busy schedule to provide a little bit of background about himself and he how strives for “paw”fection in his role at UHDS.

Q. Tell me a bit about your background. How did you end up working at Western Illinois University?

Joe and Rocky take a rest at the 2015 WIU Homecoming Leatherneck Football Game.

Joe and Rocky take a rest at the 2014 WIU Homecoming Leatherneck Football Game.

Joe: I’m originally from Prophetstown (IL). I came to WIU in 2003 to attend for my undergraduate degree and graduated in 2007 with my bachelor’s degree. All through college I worked in UHDS as a student worker and was offered an assistantship in housing following graduation, which I accepted and did for one year. In 2008, I had the rare opportunity to apply for an assistant director position for facilities and was selected, and I started my full-time career that July. I finished my master’s later that spring in 2009. In 2012, I was promoted to director of residential facilities.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you?

Joe: Every day is a little different and that is what makes it exciting. Most days start at 8 a.m. or a little before and are filled with meetings, walk-throughs of facilities, and a lot of planning. In my area, looking forward is essential, so I spend a lot of time working with members of Facilities Management, University Technology, and other campus entities mapping out things for the future.

Q. What is your favorite on-the-job memory?

Joe: My favorite job memory is probably finishing up renovation Corbin and Olson after three years of planning and construction. It taught me a lot about construction, communication, and just the overall process. When you have a project that big, there is a lot to keep track of and it was a great feeling when it was all done and completed.

Rocky and His Person, Joe Roselieb, in 2010

Rocky and His Person, Joe Roselieb, in 2010

Q. What has been your most rewarding professional experience in your career so far?

Joe: My most rewarding professional experience has been being selected as the 2011 Administrator of the Year from Western’s Division of Student Services.

Q. How do you juggle Rocky’s busy appearance schedule?

Joe: It can be very difficult at times, but we try to attend as much as possible. I’m pretty selective of the events we choose to attend, and I always make sure it coincides with the mission and values of the institution. Looking back at the last five years of the live-mascot program, it has been a gratifying experience to see how far it’s come and the amount of people it has impacted.

Q. Tell me a little about your favorite activities outside of your job (e.g., hobbies, family or friend activities, etc.).

Joe: I enjoy music and sports. I try to attend at least one or two Chicago Bears’ games a year, even though this year I think I’ll save my money. I also purchased a new house last March and work on it when I can. I also became an uncle for the first time on Sept. 28… to a niece.

Q. What is your favorite quote?

Joe: “Don’t let your failures define you, let them refine you.”

People of WIU

Dallas Boswell - People of WIU

In Fall 2014, Western Illinois University Anthropology Professor Heather McIlvaine-Newsad asked her students to use “two of the ethnographic research tools that anthropologists use–cameras and talking to, or interviewing, people” to emulate the “Humans of New York” (HONY) project for a “People of WIU” assignment.

Last week, the new best-selling book “Humans of New York” was released. You may or may not know the blog–created by Brandon Stanton–upon which the book is based.

If you do, you may have encountered the Humans of New York (HONY) project behind the blog via its huge Facebook or Twitter following. (The HONY Facebook page has close to 16 million likes and the HONY Twitter feed has more than 360K followers.)

According to the Oct. 12 ABC news article “Humans of New York Creator Reveals How He Gets People to Share Life’s Intimate Details,” over the last five years, the blog has transformed from featuring only pictures [of New Yorkers] to also telling stories”–basically, an anthology (the definition, per Merriam-Webster Unabridged, “a usually representative collection of selected literary pieces or passages”).

Bre Bracey - People of WIUSuch a project was a natural fit for an assignment in two “Introduction to Cultural Anthropology FYE” (First Year Experience) classes taught by Western Illinois University Anthropology Professor Heather McIlvaine-Newsad.

So in Fall 2014, she did just that–asked her students to use “two of the ethnographic research tools that anthropologists use–cameras and talking to, or interviewing, people” to emulate the project for a “People of WIU” assignment.

“Anthropology is about telling a story. Sometimes the story is written and sometimes it includes images. Your assignment is to tell a story about the People of WIU. The people–students, faculty, administration, individuals who work in the cafeteria, the Beu Health Center, the construction workers–are all fascinating, but we seldom take time to talk to them and find out their stories,” her instructions noted.

To complete the assignment, McIlvaine-Newsad asked her students to “write three questions that you will ask all of the people you photograph.”

Sawhney_Surya“You will need to photograph and interview a minimum of 10 people and take a minimum of 10 photos of each individual. Make sure you have your subjects complete and sign the Model Release Form, which will allow us to use their images on the WIU website. Select your three best photos and quotes, and put them in a PowerPoint presentation.”

McIlvaine-Newsad, who has been a faculty member for 15 years, said she is “constantly amazed at who my students are and what they bring to the classroom.”

“They have many stories to tell. In virtually all my classes, from study abroad courses to Germany and India or methods classes, we explore ways in which people can tell us what is important to them. Often we discover that people who may seem so very different than we are share similar powerful stories. I especially wanted to bring this message to first-year students, who are making adjusting to a new way of life as university students. Using a visual anthropology format that includes both the power of images and written word, like those from HONY, seemed like a great assignment for my students.

Kathy Clauson - People of WIUWhen asked why she had her students use the digital storytelling technique:

“The reasons for doing so vary with each course: sometimes it’s to focus a student’s research interest. Other times it’s to develop communication skills in visual or audio media. In another class, it may be to relate an experience that is more personal in nature–too personal for a more formal academic paper format,” she noted.

In this post are some of the results from her students’ completion of the assignment. These are just a smattering of the stories of the all of the “People of WIU.”

Feel free to share your story–about something that matters to you or share a lingering question you have about your life or something that is on your mind (no profanity or references to alcohol or drug use please; comments will be moderated)–in the comments below.

Imani Kutti - People of WIUDamien Pickens - People of WIU
Jodie Tan Qiu Yu - People of WIUMary Street - People of WIU

What’s in a Name?

by Darcie Shinberger

For nearly nine decades Western Illinois University has been known as the Leathernecks or the Fighting Leathernecks, but how did the University go from the “Fighting Teachers” to the Leathernecks? There’s only one answer …. because of one man.

Col. Ray "Rock" Hanson

Legendary WWI and WWII Hero and decorated Marine Corps Colonel Ray “Rock” Hanson

Legendary WWI and WWII Hero and decorated Marine Corps Colonel Ray “Rock” Hanson began his long tenure at Western in 1926. It was because of Hanson’s determination and persistence, along with his Marine Corps legacy, that helped secure The Fighting Leathernecks as WIU’s team name in 1927. Today, Western remains the only public school in the U.S. with permission to use the Leathernecks as its nickname.

Hanson, who coached football, baseball, and basketball, served as director of the physical education department and is distinguished as the longest-serving athletic director at Western. Even after his retirement in 1964, Coach Hanson remained active at Western and in the Macomb community. He passed away Jan. 4, 1982, at the age of 86.

Hanson’s name lives on at Western not only through the school’s nickname, but Col. Rock III (a/k/a Rocky), an English bulldog and Western’s mascot, is named in honor of this brave recipient of the Silver Star citation for bravery, a French Croix de Guerre, and a Purple Heart.

The first English Bulldog, a symbol of the U.S. Marine Corps, arrived at WIU in September 1959 to serve as the first official Leathernecks mascot. A few weeks later, the Student Government Association Executive Council selected the name Col. Rock for the new mascot from more than 200 entries in a naming contest. WIU student Richard Stevenson submitted the winning name.

Pennants from the Rock Hanson Collection at the Western Illinois University Bookstore

Pennants from the Rock Hanson Collection at the Western Illinois University Bookstore

While Col. Hanson has been gone for nearly 30 years, his legacy continues each and every day at Western Illinois University.

And as we say at WIU… Every Day Is a Great Day to Be a Leatherneck!

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Next time you’re at the WIU Bookstore, check out the new Ray “Rock” Hanson Vintage Collection! (You can also order online at bookstore.wiu.edu/Rock-Hanson-Collection_c_23.html.) Read more about it at www.wiu.edu/news/newsrelease.php?release_id=12897.