Starting the semester off right

by guest blogger Dan Dankert, graduate assistant, WIU-QC Student Services

Note: For some advice on starting off a successful semester, we turned to Dan Dankert, who started a food pantry on campus (which can be found online here and on Facebook). Dankert was able to launch such a venture while serving at WIU-QC as an Americorps volunteer, and enjoyed his time here so much, he decided to stay and enroll as a graduate student in college student personnel.

Guest Blogger Profile

Undergraduate degree: in Political Science from Central College (Pella, IA); graduation year- 2016
Hometown: Davenport, Iowa
Favorite hobbies and interests: Esports, Fantasy Football, Volunteering, Politics
Photo of male student sitting outdoors

Dankert, who started a food pantry on campus, knows about getting involved

The second week of classes is already in full swing. You have met your professors, read your syllabi (hopefully), and befriended some of your classmates. You now have 15+ weeks to go until the end of the semester, and hopefully the end of a great one. College is all about learning, growing, and experiencing. If you want to have the best semester possible, here just a few tips.

  1. Get Connected to Campus

    The students who have the most fulfilling college experience are students who connect with campus. You can do this in a bevy of ways. The easiest ways are to attend events on campus or join student organizations. Connecting to campus is a great way to meet new people, and find cool new activities. One of the coolest examples of this is the Academic Club for Engineering and all of the fun events they put on each year. They have some events like board game nights that are social, l and they have panels that are much more educational.

  2. Push Your Comfort Zone

    When I was in high school, I was not very involved with clubs or organizations. I was on the football team and that was about it. When I first stepped on campus my freshman year of college, that all changed. I quickly got involved with student government, mock trial, the Esports club, and many more. At first it was difficult balancing school, work, and activities, but by pushing my boundaries I grew in my abilities and as a person.

  3. Always Look Ahead

    Do you know what homework is due in all of your classes this week? What about next week? Are you going to be out of town all weekend? Do you normally do most of your homework for the next week on the weekend? It’s so easy to fall behind your classes if you aren’t looking ahead. It’s crucial to know what homework you have over the next several weeks so that you can work ahead if you need to. This is probably most important near the end of the semester when book reports, semester papers, semester projects, and finals all seem to be due at the same time. One of the ways to keep all of your classes and projects organized is to put important due dates on your Google Calendar that you get just by being a WIU student. It’s a great place to keep all of the most important dates to remember both for school and for your life outside of school.

  4. Be Respectful

    You are in college now and there is a certain level of maturity expected of all students. It’s important to treat your professors, classmates, and campus staff with respect. This tip is a great tip for succeeding in college but also in life. One way this might come up is if you have to miss school and you know about it ahead of time. By being polite and talking with the professor about it can make a big difference. You will most likely have to do some sort of makeup and the professor can give you plenty of time to get it done before you ever miss school. Also, by being mature and telling the professor ahead of time, you can build a rapport with them.

  5. Be Engaged

    This might be the best tip of all. It’s so easy to take days off, or skimp on readings here and there. But it’ss vital to always be engaged with everything that you do. If you’re doing readings for class and you realize you were dozing off, don’t keep reading, go back and make sure you understand all of the material. If you are in class and there is a discussion going on, make sure you are listening to everyone’s points and try to bring a unique viewpoint to the conversation if you can. When you are engaged you are learning and when you are learning you are succeeding.

    Ultimately your college path will be decided by you. You decide how much time you want to spend on campus connecting with student organizations and your fellow students. Finally, you decide how much fun you will have on campus. The possibilities for learning and fun are endless here on WIU-QC all you have to do is seize them.

Do you have tips and advice to share with current or prospective students? Are you a graduate who can share some thoughts about what led to your success? To suggest a post, contact Public Information Specialist Alison McGaughey at ar-mcgaughey@wiu.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meet Michelle Howe from WIU’s Career Development Center

Michelle Howe

Michelle Howe (right), her husband Matt (a 2009 graduate of WIU’s School of Agriculture), and their Future Leatherneck daughter, Macie. Michelle is an assistant director in Western’s Career Development Center, which provides career services for WIU students and alumni.

Ever wish you had a go-to person to help you with career advice or to critique your r?sum??

As one of the dedicated members of the Western Illinois University Career Development Center (CDC) staff, CDC Assistant Director Michelle Howe is one of these “go-to” individuals who students (as well as WIU Alumni) seek out for help when it comes to preparing for a job search and the employment-searching process itself.

Michelle, who is also a WIU alumna, graciously agreed to be featured for the second installment of the Council of Administrative Personnel (COAP) Employee Spotlight, a monthly feature (sponsored by the COAP organization) to showcase the varied jobs, talents, services, and resources COAP employees do, have, provide, and share as employees of Western. (Read the inaugural installment, “Meet One Tough (and Fun) Mudder: Tim Hallinan” at wiurelations.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/coap-spotlight-hallinan/.)

Learn more about Michelle and what she does at Western’s CDC below.

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Q. Tell me a bit about your background. How did your employment with WIU come about?

Michelle: I attended WIU as a transfer student to complete my bachelor of science degree in agriculture. At the time, I was engaged to a local Lewistown farmer, Matt [who is also a WIU alum], and I knew I would be living in this area. I decided to attend graduate school at WIU to pursue a new career in student affairs, rather than agriculture. I graduated from the WIU’s College Student Personnel program in 2011 and was fortunate to apply for a job at the Career Development Center, where I had completed my two years as a graduate assistant.

Working in career development was the reason I decided to apply for the CSP program, so I am very blessed to be working at the CDC today! WIU has been a great place to learn, grow, and develop lifelong friendships.

Q. What does a typical day at work at Western look like for you?

Michelle: As with most jobs, my days are not always “typical,” but my main responsibility as the assistant director is to assist students with the job search and career development process. Many days are spent in one-on-one sessions with students, advising them on career planning (deciding which career path to take and figuring out what they should “do” at WIU to be prepared for this career field) and advising them on job-searching strategies. This includes critiquing r?sum?s, cover letters, graduate school essays, and other professional correspondence.

I also conduct mock interviews with students to give them constructive feedback on their interviewing skills using an iPad, so that they can see their strengths and areas for improvement. I also teach students how to use LinkedIn as a professional networking and job searching tool. Each week, I also conduct daytime/evening workshops to student organizations, classrooms, fraternities/sororities, etc., on career development topics, especially LinkedIn. Each semester, I teach a career-preparation class, which teaches the job-searching process to students.

Throughout the year, I serve on a few committees, conduct outreach efforts to academic departments, research current trends in career development, write newsletter articles on behalf of the office, create flyers for our workshops and other events, and supervise the CDC graduate assistants.

That is what I love about my job–I do so many different things each day that it keeps my life interesting!

Q. What are some of the best aspects of your job? What are some of the most challenging aspects?

The best thing about my job is the PEOPLE! Most of the students I work with are hard-working students, who just need a little guidance on their job searches. Many of our students are first-generation college students, and since I was also a first-gen student, I can relate to how they are feeling about college and about the job-searching process. Some of the students visit me more than once, to make sure their interviewing skills are getting better, or to get new advice on their future goals.

It is rewarding to see a student get the job he or she was hoping for, or land an interview for an internship.

I also LOVE my coworkers and appreciate the uniqueness we each bring to the CDC… we are definitely a family!

The most challenging aspect about my job is seeing students who NEVER stop by the CDC to get help with the job-searching process. Some students don’t know our office exists, some do not think they need help with their r?sum?s, and others plan to make an appointment and do not follow through. I wish every student would stop by our office at least once!

Q. What do you like to do in your time away from work?

Michelle: Though I am professionally fulfilled by working at WIU, my heart is at home! I have an 18-month old daughter, Macie, who is an energetic, lovable, stubborn toddler. Recently, we purchased a bike with a trailer and plan to ride around with Macie and make bike riding a new hobby.

I enjoy spending time with my husband on our rural Lewistown farm, where we raise cows, corn, soybeans, and wheat. Together, we enjoy doing landscaping and home improvement projects. We love to have family and friends stop by the farm to ride in the John Deere gator, sit on the deck to watch the fire pit, and enjoy the scenery.

I also enjoy reading books, watching movies, and shopping for good deals at garage sales! I am also very active in my faith and enjoy going to church and studying the Bible.

Q. What is your favorite quote?

Michelle: “Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life.” — Steve Jobs

CSP Grad Candidate’s Social Media Work Helps Beu Health Ed Reach Out to WIU Students

Rebecca Novick

Rebecca Novick, a grad student in Western’s college student personnel program, posing with a puppy named Roscoe. As the person in charge of Beu Health Education’s social media accounts this semester, Novick has worked to reach out to WIU students about health and wellness issues.

Northport, New York, native Rebecca Novick, who is currently a graduate student in Western’s college student personnel (CSP) program, applied to the program after hearing about it from those she worked with at her undergraduate institution, University at Buffalo (UB).

“While there, I became heavily involved in on-campus student leadership positions, such as student union manager, as well as served in an internship for the Center for Student Leadership and Community Engagement. Toward the end of my sophomore year, I took some time to reflect on what it was I enjoyed most about my undergraduate experience. What I found was that my positions on campus were where I found the most fulfillment and enjoyment, so I decided to pursue the field of student affairs. After speaking with some of my professional staff members, I found that many of them had attended WIU for their degrees in CSP. After researching the CSP program here and finding how well known and well respected it is, I decided I would apply,” she explained.

From her experiences at UB, as well as the knowledge she has gained as a WIU CSP grad student, Rebecca has been using social media for Beu Health Education to reach out to WIU students and provide them with important information about Beu’s resources, as well as about health and wellness issues in general.

Recently, she answered a few questions about the kind of work she is doing for Beu Health Ed, as well as how the work will help her in her future student affairs career.

Q. What do you do for Beu Health Education?

Novick: I am a practicum student for Beu Health Education, and my main responsibility is to manage all social media outlets. I mostly focus on our Facebook and Twitter communications and schedule posts and tweets for each week.

In the beginning of the semester, we (a few other staff members and myself) brainstormed a list of themes we could use for each week. The themes were picked based on current issues facing students, as well as the time of the semester. As I construct posts and tweets, I think of ways in which I can engage students to use the tips and resources shared in our posts and then reflect on how they can improve upon their own practices. In order to do this, I post a series of tips and tricks and then ask if our followers could share their own thoughts or helpful practices.

Q. What have you learned while working in this role for Beu Health Education?

Novick: During my time in Beu Health Education, I have learned that wellness means much more than just taking care of yourself, in terms of exercise, nutrition, and illness. I have come to learn that wellness incorporates many aspects of being, such as financial, spiritual, and intellectual wellness.

Over the course of this semester, I have also learned there are many wellness issues students face that are not always viewed as pertinent concerns. For instance, it is common for students to experience stress, sleep deprivation, and caffeine addiction. Although these may seem like common symptoms of merely being a college student, these practices can become areas of concern if not addressed. I have found Beu Health Center to be well equipped with resources to help students form healthy habits and work through such issues.

Lastly, I have found that social media can be an effective way to communicate the resources and tips needed to help work through common issues on college campuses. As our social media community grows, we are not only able to share information, but we have also been learning new practices, ways to remain relevant to our students, and find helpful resources.

Q. What are your career plans?

Novick: Following my intended graduation this spring, I hope to return to New York and work within the State University of New York (SUNY) or City University of New York (CUNY) public higher education systems. Ideally, I aspire to work within student union management or student leadership development, but I am open to many possibilities.

Q. How do you think you’ll be able to apply what you have learned working for Beu Health Education to your future career?

Novick: As social media continues to grow as an information-sharing platform, I would like to use it as a source for cross-promotion of not only offices across a university’s campus, but also to cross-promote other institutions, as well as the surrounding community. I think there are many benefits of institutions and their communities working together to help raise awareness of all opportunities and resources available to students and community members.

I also feel the knowledge I have gained relating to student wellness can help me to be a more aware and empathetic student affairs professional. In order for me to be able to effectively help students grow, I must understand their struggles and barriers. Having learned how to identify symptoms of many health concerns students face, the more I can do to help.

Q. What is the most rewarding project or enlightening activity you experienced in your work for Beu Health Education?

Novick: In general, I would say the most enlightening experiences I have had while working in Beu Health Education are the opportunities I have had to further my knowledge in WIU’s social media community. I have had numerous meetings with offices and representatives across campus to learn more about their approaches to marketing and building a social media presence. During this process, I have built many relationships and learned much about the functions of various offices around campus. I have been using these opportunities to make connections via social media to help cross-promote events and resources happening across campus.

Q. Anything else you think is important to share?

Novick: I have found the offices and staff associated with Beu Health Education to be extremely helpful and knowledgeable. There are such a large variety of resources and opportunities available to all students, not just those who are struggling with wellness. Not only is the professional staff at Beu Health Education friendly and accommodating, but student peer educators are also extremely knowledgeable and an asset to the office.

I hope students and community members continue to utilize the resources and services Beu Health Education has to offer, whether it is through attending a program, setting up an appointment for individual help, or just stopping by to find out more.

Follow Beu Health Education on Twitter at twitter.com/BeuHealthEd and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/BeuHealthCenter.

The Making of the #WIUnselfie Movement

WIU Students taking part in the WIUnselfie Movement

Brett Moody, Caitlyn Westfall, and Brian Kocher, students in Western’s College Student Personnel (CSP) Program working on the #WIUnselfie Movement project. According to the CSP student group, the mission of the WIUnselfie Movement is to develop a culture of positive community built upon meaningful connections through social media. The student group responsible for the project aims to reverse selfie culture by promoting recognition of others through accountability and awareness of often overlooked qualities, achievements, and good will at Western.

A few weeks ago, two Western graduate students reached out to us for a brief meet up in the University Relations Office. They wanted help in promoting their “WIUnselfie movement,” a project that they, and some of their fellow master’s candidates in Western’s College Student Personnel Program (CSP), were involved in via one of their CSP courses.

Naturally, we wanted to know what it was all about–as you likely do, particularly if you have seen their various messages around campus. So, with the help of her fellow students, Caitlyn Westfall (Macomb, IL) provided me with the details of the project and how the students hope to use it to “reverse selfie culture” on social media these days.

Q: Tell me about how the #WIUnselfie project came about.

Caitlyn: This project came from one of the classes in Western’s CSP Program. We were given the project by one of our professors to “make the world a better place.” We were not given any other context other than that. We talked for a few weeks about some things we thought could make a change in the world around us (to the Western Illinois University/Macomb community).

One of our group members brought up an idea of doing something selfless, such as leaving sticky-notes with positive messages around WIU’s campus. From there, another member brought up an idea he had observed in his undergraduate experience–he and his friend tried to get an “unselfie” movement started. The purpose of that movement was to promote unselfish acts and recognize the people who perform them. Examples of this are such things as holding the door open for someone behind you or paying for the person behind you in the drive-thru line. From there, we worked out the details, and the hashtag #WIUnselfie was born, and we went from there!

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkVrrvgSeZY]
WIU College Student Personnel Master’s Degree Candidates made this video as part of their “WIUnselfie Movement” for a project in CSP Professor Tracy Davis’s group dynamics course.

Q: Who is involved with it here at Western?

Caitlyn: The people involved are primarily in Dr. Tracy Davis’s group dynamics class.

Q: What does the group hope to accomplish with this project?

Caitlyn: We have seen a rise in negative social media lately, and we wanted to find a way to spread positive social media. We are hoping that by creating a new outlet for positive social media to take over, we’ll be creating a new buzz on campus. Instead of sitting around the lunch table gossiping negatively about their peers, we are hoping students, faculty, staff, and community members talk about the great things going on.

WIUnselfies on Instagram

Follow the WIUnselfie Movement on Instagram at instagram.com/wiunselfies

Q: How will the group go about accomplishing these goals?

Caitlyn: We have created an Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook page for people to submit pictures to. We also have these social media outlets so that we are able to promote the movement itself. We have gone around campus a few different times getting pictures of people or groups doing great things and also getting the word out. We have created a neat Instagram style frame for people to take pictures with. We have also promoted our movement as big campus events such as the Fall Leadership Conference and Make A Difference Day and we saw great feedback from that.

Q: Who are the other CSP students involved?

Caitlyn: Danielle Buckner (Lake Forest, CA), Amy Bumatai (Mililani, HI), Melinda Daniels (Milwaukee, WI), Brian Kocher (Henry, IL), Maggie Miller (Boone, IA), Brett Moody (Taylorville, IL), Kelly Severs (Macomb, IL), and our group facilitator Emily Simon (Moncolva, OH).

Q: Anything else I neglected to ask you about in the above-listed questions that would be important to include?

Caitlyn: Anyone can find us on Instagram at @wiunselfies, Facebook at www.facebook.com/wiunselfiemovement, Twitter at @wiunselfies, or we can be emailed at wiunselfiemovement@gmail.com.

Working for Western at Western: Beu Health Ed’s Grad Student Andy Lehr Talks Experience

Andy Lehr, WIU College Student Personnel Graduate Student

Andy Lehr, a graduate student in Western Illinois University’s College Student Personnel Program, is pictured here at the University Union in March, where he helped Beu Health Education with the implementation of Kick Butts Day, a national event sponsored by the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. The event increases awareness about the hazards of smoking and using tobacco.

As Spring 2013 Commencement Weekend commences at Western, many soon-to-be WIU alumni are looking toward the world of work that lie ahead. And while it may be daunting to go out into wilds of the job market (particularly in a still-recovering U.S. economy) with not-so-much work experience, many students–both undergraduate and graduate–have had the chance to gain experience working in some capacity for WIU. Andy Lehr is one of those students.

A graduate student in Western’s College Student Personnel program, Andy has been working for Beu Health Education this past semester. He will continue his post at Beu Health Ed in Fall 2013, too. (He also serves as the assistant complex director at Tanner Hall for WIU Housing and Dining Services.)

When I met Andy earlier this year, he was filled with positive energy and ideas about how to help Beu Health Education with its outreach efforts. Recently, he took some time out of his busy grad-student schedule to answer some questions about what he does for Beu and how the experience has helped him acquire skills that he’ll be able to use when he finishes his master’s program.

Q.) What do you do for Beu Health Education?
I am a practicum student for Beu Health Education. It is a requirement of the College Student Personnel master’s degree program that I am in here at Western. As a practicum student, I work for Beu Health Education for eight hours a week.

Q.) What kinds of duties/tasks do you do for Beu Health Education?
My main role is to manage the social media for the office. I work with Twitter and Facebook in order to help and send different health and wellness information out to the WIU community and anyone else that wants to follow Beu Health Ed. I have also assisted in the facilitation of the training for the certified peer education program, Students T.A.L.K., that Beu Health Education offers. In addition to those things, I also sit in on a variety of meetings (such as the weekly update meetings for the AOD [Alcohol and Other Drug] Center and Beu Health Education).

Follow Beu Health Ed on Twitter @BeuHealthEd

Follow Beu Health Ed on Twitter @BeuHealthEd

Q.) How do you use social media to help disseminate info. to students at WIU?
I use social media to get quick health and wellness facts out to all of those that follow us on Twitter and Facebook. I try to focus on one certain topic each week and then Tweet four or five facts and tips a day about the topic. The topics usually align with “Stall Talk,” which are put out weekly by Liz Andrews, the Beu Health Education graduate assistant.

Through the Beu Health Ed Twitter account, I also follow many other health and wellness sites that offer quality information, and I will often retweet that information out to the WIU community. I have also found that using social media to promote different events happening on campus, (Beu Health Ed related events or general campus events) is a great way to help get the word out and support other departments across the WIU campus.

Q.) What are some of the most rewarding/informative experiences you’ve had in your work for Beu Health Education?
So far, the most rewarding thing has been getting to work in a department outside of what I have been used to. Most of my previous work has been focused on residence life, and it has been very exciting for me have this new experience. Getting to work with Liz Andrews, JoAnn Hairston-Jones [Beu Health Education Coordinator], and everyone else that I have been able to work with, has been a really great experience. I enjoy being able to build new relationships and meeting new people, and without this practicum opportunity, I probably would not have had the opportunity to meet the great people who work in Beu Health Education.

Along with social media, I have come across a lot of other useful information because of working with Beu Health Education. Beu’s Health Education Office promotes the health and wellness of students here at WIU in many different ways. As a student, I try to take advantage of some of the services that are offered. For example, there is a stress-management technique called “Freeze-Frame,” which is used here, and I have been able to use that myself to try and help manage my own stress. Also, while doing research to find information that I want to tweet about, I have been able to increase my knowledge on the different aspects of wellness.

It has been a great experience for me to work for an office that focuses on health and wellness, because I feel everything that I work on I can relate to my own life in some way. I mean, I’m sure that a lot of people talk about stress, health, and wellness in their daily conversations with their co-workers, but I don’t know how many other opportunities exist where the goal of the office is to promote different health and wellness techniques and information. I’m really grateful to have been given this opportunity, and I enjoy the hours that I am able to come into the office each week to work.

Q). How do you think your work for/with Beu Health Education will help you in your future career?
First, I feel as though working with social media will turn out to be an important experience. We are living in a world today where the many different types of social media play an important role in our lives. People seem to be attached to their phones, constantly checking for Facebook and Twitter updates. While some may view this as a negative aspect–given that it seems as though there can be a dependence on technology at times–it is also a great opportunity to do a lot of good. If there are good messages that can be sent out through different outlets of social media, it is important to be using those in the right way.

I think the experiences I have had so far this semester have taught me some of the tools necessary to know how to use social media for good reasons. To have an understanding of social media and how to use it effectively, I think could be very important for me moving forward in whatever it is that I do.

Q). What are your future career plans?
Even though I am working toward my master’s degree in Western’s College Student Personnel program, I am still not sure what my future career plans really are. I decided to pursue this degree because I love working with others and especially because of the opportunity to be able to work on a college campus. College just seems to be such a fun and unique environment to be in, so I can see myself continuing to work in some capacity in student affairs. I’m not sure where I will end up after completing my master’s program here, but I know I want to be working with others in a position where I am able to make a positive impact on others’ lives.

Q). Anything else you think should be included/highlighted I didn’t ask you about?
I would just like to share that there are so many great opportunities and services offered here in Beu Health Education. I hope that students continue to utilize the different resources offered from this office. I wasn’t very aware of Beu Health Education before I became a practicum student here, but after working and seeing everything that goes on here, I now know there are some great services and resources that are beneficial to the WIU community. There are different outreach programs and presentations throughout the year, which are often conducted and implemented by student leaders from Beu Health Ed, and then there are also individual consultations available to help handle concerns, such as sleep management and tobacco cessation.

I encourage everyone to check out the office to see if there are any services provided that may be beneficial, even if only in a small way, to their daily health and well-being. Other than that, just make sure to follow us on Twitter @BeuHealthEd! And thank you very much for taking the time to let me share my experiences!